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The 8 Best Campgrounds and Camping Spots in Western Australia

Camping In Western Australia Campground Tent

Sink into serenity at these popular camping spots across Western Australia!

Imagine waking up to the refreshing sound of crashing waves, or the tranquil chirps of morning birds nestled in a swaying forest. Imagine zipping open your tent on a mountaintop or in the middle of an open field, with the morning sun bursting upon your soul. And then imagine the serenity, as you realise that the world is actually much simpler than you’ve been making it out to be.

This could be you right now, but you’ve done the next best thing: you’ve considered the prospect! The first step in any adventure isn’t a physical one; it’s thinking about it. And now that you’re here, let us swoon your mind with more than just ideas. Let’s fill it with options!

We’ve sourced the best campgrounds and camping spots in Western Australia. From the coastline to foothills of mountains. Each campsite showcases serenity wrapped up in picturesque beauty, along with the opportunity to escape the banalities of your busy life.

Let’s get camping!

Conto Campground
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Conto Campground

Conto Campground is a wonderful allrounder, perfect for chillers and adventurers. You can find plenty of relaxing spots to melt your worries away. Or, if you’re an adventurer at heart, you could tackle the Cape to Cape walking track. It’s a moderately challenging walk, and the intermittent views are spectacular! This campground features toilets and drinking water taps, but maybe consider going for a swim to clean yourself.

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Mimbi Caves Campground
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Mimbi Caves Campground

Deep in the heartland of Western Australia’s top end is a campground like no other. It features everything you need for a comfortable stay, sprawling views of rugged bushland, as well as a sprawling system of caves that showcase the great history of Australia. And yes, they offer tours! What was once the site of the Devonian Great Barrier Reef over 350 million years ago is now a natural museum that showcases fish fossils and extensive Aboriginal rock art.

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Potters Gorge Campground
Photographed by Frances Andrijich.
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Potters Gorge Campground

Here is one of the most popular camping spots in Western Australia during the warmer months – not just for the massive dam you could swim in, but even for the shade and serenity. It’s also what some would call “real camping” with the only amenity being a drop toilet. But, with a massive lake on your doorstep, who needs a shower? There are also plenty of uplifting walks to do, including a nice one to Honeymoon Pool, which is simply a quaint watering hole amongst hovering trees.

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Le Grand Beach Campsite
Photographed by @jamesvodicka.
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Le Grand Beach Campsite

The local activities at Le Grand Beach Campsite are numerous. Think surfing and swimming, bushwalking and fishing. We’d even recommend bringing a snorkel and checking out the underwater view at the nearby beach. Be wary, though, as this place can get windy. Don’t be afraid to staple down a few extra pegs to keep your tent secure. The campground also features a decent amenities block, with flushing toilets and solar-powered showers. Exactly what camping in Western Australia should be!

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Lane Poole Reserve
Photographed by Russell Ord Photography.
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Lane Poole Reserve

Just an hour-and-a-half drive south of Perth, Lane Poole Reserve in Dwellingup plays host to a lot of beauty and possible activities. Depending on what you bring, you could go canoeing or kayaking, mountain biking, fishing, or even horse riding if it pleases you. The reserve itself, though, is serene and beautiful enough that could just stroll within it for hours on end. As for amenities, there’s a drop toilet, barbecues and picnic tables, but that’s about it. Still one of the best campgrounds in Western Australia!

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Whalebone Bay Campground
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Whalebone Bay Campground

The Whalebone Bay Campground is situated in Shark Bay, the furthest west point within Australia. It’s also a campground where you need to bring everything, as there are no facilities – just the endless ocean before you. Also, you will find it hard to get a phone signal here. It really is the place to get away, even just for a night, with the emptiness allowing for one of the most breathtaking views of the night sky, matched with nearby crashing waves.

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Osprey Bay Campground
Image via Tourism Western Australia.

Osprey Bay Campground

Ningaloo Reef in mid-north Western Australia showcases some of the best beaches in the state. Most especially at Osprey Bay, where the camping ground is sparse and beautiful. There is an onsite toilet, but no showers or fresh drinking water. So be prepared and bring the necessities. Despite this, the location is the very definition of serene, with crystal blue waters and captivating local fauna. Also, bring snorkels. You’ll thank us later!

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Nullarbor Plain
Photographed by totajla. Image via Shutterstock.

Nullarbor Plain

Along the Nullarbor Plain you can discover how small you truly are by seeing how large the world really is. Better yet, you can camp here. Described as one of the best campgrounds in Western Australia, there are dozens of camping spots along the Nullarbor Plain, each offering distant horizons and nearly treeless surroundings. Of course, many of them will have no amenities at all, so remember to bring the bare essentials. You can even turn this into a road trip to Adelaide, which will take up a good couple of days to undertake.

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Before you relax at one of the best campgrounds in Western Australia, bring Matthew McConaughey along with this limited-edition tent. Or, keep yourself busy by exploring the Best Caves around Western Australia.

We acknowledge the traditional owners of country throughout Australia and recognise their continuing connection to land, waters and culture. We pay our respects to their elders past, present and emerging.

Feature image: Photographed by @jamesvodicka. Image via Tourism Western Australia.
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