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Easy Guide to the 8 Best Seafood and Wine Pairings

Easy Guide to the 8 Best Seafood and Wine Pairings. Photographed by Stefan Johnson. Image via Unsplash.

Create a sophisticated feast with these must-try seafood and wine pairings!

Barramundi cooked in a garlic lemon sauce served with your favourite riesling, to tomato-drenched mussels accompanied by a glass of pinot noir; a few simple ingredients paired with your favourite fish will help elevate your meal. Of course, all paired with the finest drops!

To make this a reality, we’ve reached out to FishMe, Sydney’s one-stop-shop for freshly delivered seafood. They sell every style of seafood and, with that, they know every unique taste, with industry knowledge on which wines go with which seafood.

So, to help you prepare your next seafood degustation at home, we’ve put together an easy guide to the best seafood and wine pairings you must try!

Baby Octopus Wine Pairing

Baby octopus
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Baby octopus

Baby octopus is a popular ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine, and it’s delicious on barbecues or in a casserole. Marinate this wild-caught baby octopus for an hour in white wine vinegar, lemon juice, olive oil and cracked salt and pepper for the perfect tangy and juicy flavour. Fry it in a cast-iron skillet or on the barbeque until golden for the perfect date night dinner.

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Waterhorse Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc
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Waterhorse Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc

If you’re looking for the best white wine with seafood, you can’t go wrong with this drop. Better yet, baby octopus pairs well with Sauvignon Blanc, ideally this Waterhorse Malborough Sauvignon Blanc that is both crisp and citrusy. On the nose, expect notes of passionfruit and grapefruit, with fresh acidity on rumble with the salty, savoury flavours from the barbecued baby octopus.

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Barramundi Fish Wine Pairing

Whole Barramundi
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Whole Barramundi

Barramundi is one of the most popular catches for recreational fishers and is renowned for its generous size, as well as its buttery, clean white flesh. Pair this incredible fresh barramundi with a creamy garlic lemon butter sauce. Saute minced garlic in a small saucepan with butter until fragrant and golden, stir in lemon juice and dried basil, add salt to taste and remove from the heat. Serve with a fried or steamed whole barramundi to truly wow your dinner party.

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Brand & Sons Coonawarra Bandits Riesling
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Brand & Sons Coonawarra Bandits Riesling

Pairing wine with fish and seafood doesn’t need to be complicated. And this is why the Brand & Sons Coonawarra Bandits Riesling is perfect thanks to its dry and acidic texture that is bursting with citrus. Expect some lemon blossom and a floral lift, both which afford the buttery garlic notes of your barramundi to blend harmoniously. Whether your barramundi is fried or steamed, the sauce heroes the wine, helping the dry and fruity notes bloom through with each mouthful.

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Mussels Wine Pairing

Live Spring Bay Black Mussels
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Live Spring Bay Black Mussels

Spring Bay mussels are award-winning mussels that are popular for fine dining and grown in the pristine waters of Tasmania. Warm yourself up on a winter’s evening with a bowl full of mussels. We recommend pairing it with a rich marinara sauce for a heavenly flavour. Cook butter, garlic, eschalots, spring onions, tinned tomatoes, Italian herbs, and chilli flakes in a frypan over medium heat. Add mussels to the pan and cook for 10 minutes, then serve. Preferably with a pinot noir to match!

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Freycinet Louis Pinot Noir
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Freycinet Louis Pinot Noir

With most seafood, red wine is simply a no-go zone. Especially if the seafood is served as is, without other additions to whirl up the flavour profile. But with this acidic and spicy dish, featuring mussels as the hero, a light red is most appeasing, preferably the Freycinet Louis Pinot Noir. With subtle oak and a foresty perfume, along with a rounded palate, it is sure to feel like a happily married couple across your tongue.

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Lobster Wine Pairing

Cooked Southern Rock Lobsters
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Cooked Southern Rock Lobsters

Some people would start their dinner party with oysters or prawns, but we dare you to get adventurous with lobster. FishMe recommends a lobster slider, a mini version of a lobster roll. With your cooked Southern Rock Lobster, simply scoop out the available lobster meat and mix with mayonnaise, sour cream, shallots, tarragon, lemon zest, and celery. Then paste the mix onto some buttered rolls, whether toasted or fresh. However you eat lobster, it’s always best to match with chardonnay.

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Which Way Is Up? Chardonnay
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Which Way Is Up? Chardonnay

The reason why white wine pairs best with seafood – much like this Chardonnay and lobster – is due to their taste and texture. Some Chardonnays are aged in oak barrels, bringing notes of vanilla, others are very fruit-driven. The Which Way Is Up? Chardonnay is the latter, offering a simple and effective match with the light and buttery flavours of your lobster. Side note, however you serve your lobster, make sure it’s buttery!

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Kingfish Wine Pairing

Hiramasa Kingfish Sashimi
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Hiramasa Kingfish Sashimi

Kingfish is the perfect start to a multi-course meal. Both because it jolts the appetite and cleanses the palate. And it doesn’t have to be an award-winning dish either. Simply slice up a few citrusy fruits, add some texture with nuts or crushed crackers, then drizzle in a flavoursome jus. You could even cook up some vegetables to add to the mix. The trick is to match the umami flavour of the kingfish with a mix of acidity and salt. Only then will it combine beautifully with our wine pairing, merlot.

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Beresford Bell Tower Merlot
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Beresford Bell Tower Merlot

If you’re trying to find a kingfish wine pairing, it is important to blend the dish with a wine that is just as daring as the saltiness of the seafood. We recommend the Beresford Bell Tower Merlot, a berry-heavy and juicy thick red wine. Expect dark mulberry and fresh plum, with treats of red cherry and slight spice. The berry flavours, along with red cherry, shall uplift your kingfish dish to wondrous heights.

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Mud Crab Wine Pairing

Mud Crab
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Mud Crab

Mud crabs are known for their meatiness, as well as their sweet, moist, and firm flesh. Pair this delicious Australian mud crab with a spicy garlic and chill sauce, made of easy-to-source pantry ingredients. Roast a whole bulb of garlic, a small onion, two cups of vegetable stock, ground pepper, and freshly sliced red chili in the oven at 230 degrees. Add your crab and coat the shell with sauce, cook at 240 degrees for 20 minutes and serve with a garnish of lemon. Oh, and as for your wine pairing…

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Jansz Premium Cuvee
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Jansz Premium Cuvee

Honestly, any seafood goes with a sparkling wine – especially dry proseccos. But with this hearty dish, featuring the soft umami flavour of mud crab and those tarty vegetable flavours, a boastful cuvee is in order. Ideally, the Jansz Premium Cuvee, grown and fermented in northern Tasmania. With sweet honeysuckle and citrusy scents, including roasted nuts and strawberry on the palate, it’ll be a match made in heaven!

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Prawns Wine Pairing

XL Australian Cooked Tiger Prawns
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XL Australian Cooked Tiger Prawns

Now, there are a myriad of ways to serve your tiger prawns – from the classic prawn cocktail, served in a coup glass with tartare sauce lining the base; to mixing it in a spicy seafood spaghetti marinara. But, to perfectly match with a Pinot Grigio, we recommend serving it fresh with a squeeze of lemon, so as to match nicely with the umami flavour of prawn with the crisp and light body of a pinot grigio. And also because it’s fun watching your friends try and remember how to peel a prawn.

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Wild Oats Pinot Grigio
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Wild Oats Pinot Grigio

On its own, prawns don’t do entirely well with any wine, which is why we recommend adding lemon. You could even add a light white sauce to accompany, like tartare or even Thousand Island dressing. However, if you’re looking for the best wine with prawns, the citrus, and even the tarty spices from sauce, will bring out the fruity side of this Wild Oats Pinot Grigio – predominately apple and pear.

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Oysters Wine Pairing

St. Helen's Shucked Pacific Oysters
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St. Helen's Shucked Pacific Oysters

Here’s another perfect start to a multi-course meal! And FishMe serves them freshly shucked to your door. Some people love them au naturale, and others prefer a little dressing to liven the flavour. If you must have a topping, stick to acidic flavours like citrus or tangy soy, and don’t be afraid to get a little adventurous with texture! Maybe add some finely chopped carrot or scoop of caviar which FishMe also sell. And whether au naturale or delicately dressed, be sure to pair with a rosé wine!

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Days Of Rosé Dry Rosé
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Days Of Rosé Dry Rosé

The best wine to pair freshly shucked oysters with is a dry rosé wine. The best dry rosés are found in France, but this baby is made in South Australia’s Barossa Valley utilizing French methodology with French grapes, bringing a fruity, complex concoction that is dry enough to suit even au naturale seafood.  Expect a myriad of flavours, from strawberry and raspberry aromas, with hints of cherry, rose petal, and star anise.

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Feature image: Photographed by Stefan Johnson. Image via Unsplash.
Editor’s Note: Our writers and contributors have independently selected and curated this article, and all opinions are their own. This article does contain affiliate links which allow us to make revenue off some purchases made by our readers.
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