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Brisbane’s 7 Best Secluded Walking Tracks

Secluded Rainforest Boardwalk. Photographed by Madeline Paulsen. Image supplied via Hunter and Bligh

Been cooped up at home for too long? These seven suburban secluded walking spots around Brisbane might be just what you need!

Going out for an afternoon walk can be a great way to relax and get your all-important step count up. But if you’re starting to get sick of the ‘round the block’ route, why not venture a little farther out and into nature. These secluded walking tracks are dotted all around Brisbane’s suburbs and are the perfect way to get some fresh air and take in the gorgeous natural environment.

Boombana, Mount Nebo
Boombana Mt Nebo. Photographed by Justin Phipps. Image via Instagram (justinno_phipps)

Boombana, Mount Nebo

Nestled in the D’Aguilar National Park in Brisbane’s North, Boombana is perfect for those who want to discover some vastly different scenery all within a 40-minute drive from Brisbane’s CBD. There are two different tracks leaving from the Boombana Picnic Area: the Pitta Circuit, an easy 1.1 kilometre walk; and the longer Thylogale Track which is 8 kilometres return and takes approximately four hours. The paths take you through an open eucalypt forest and damp rainforest areas which lead visitors to the ever-popular Jollys Lookout – home to some spectacular views. With a picnic area and amenities nearby, you could even make a day of it.

Boombana, Mt Nebo Road, Mt Nebo
Greenes Falls, Mount Glorious
Greenes Falls. Photographed by Melissa Roberson. Image supplied

Greenes Falls, Mount Glorious

This relatively easy hiking track is another gem in the D’Aguilar National Park area with lush rainforest surrounds and plenty of birdlife. The Greenes Falls Track itself – which is 2.3 kilometre return – begins at the Maiala Picnic Ground and leads down to a viewing platform over the falls. If this isn’t enough, you can also start your journey at the Rainforest Circuit, an extra 2 kilometres, or add the 500 metre Cypress Grove Track to the end of your walk. If you aren’t fond of stairs or inclines, this may not be the track for you but the view at the end may be worth your while.

Maiala Picnic Ground, Mt Glorious Road, Mt Glorious
J.C. Slaughter Falls
JC Slaughter Falls. Photographed by Danny Stone. Image supplied

J.C. Slaughter Falls

Another Brisbane favourite, J.C. Slaughter Falls is only 15 minutes from Brisbane’s CBD and lies at the base of Mount Coot-tha. Despite its name, the falls rarely ever see flowing water; only after a significant downpour will you see anything worthy of waterfall status. It is still a particularly lovely 600 metre walk to the falls, or you can challenge yourself and continue on the steep, 2 kilometre track to the summit of Mount Coot-tha. Once you reach the peak, make sure to reward yourself for your hard work by taking in the sweeping, panoramic views of Brisbane and an ice cream while you’re at it.

38 Sir Samuel Griffith Dr, Mount Coot-tha
Karawatha Forest
Karawatha Forest. Photographed by Nick Guarino. Image supplied

Karawatha Forest

This large section of bushland in Brisbane’s south encompasses numerous walking tracks that span eucalyptus bushland, freshwater lagoons, wetlands and sandstone ridges. If you’re looking for a longer walk, try the uphill Rocks Circuit (8 kilometres) or, if you’re after more of a laid-back experience, meander past small freshwater lagoons on the Melaleuca Circuit (1 kilometre). There are plenty of amenities including a sizeable picnic and barbecue area, a playground and the Karawatha Forest Discovery Centre. For the birdwatching enthusiasts, there are over 100 species of bird to be found in addition to the plethora of wildlife that inhabit the protected area.

Illaweena Street, Drewvale
Lota Creek Boardwalk
Lota Creek Boardwalk. Photographed by Karl Paustian. Image via Instagram (@karlpaustian)

Lota Creek Boardwalk

Along Brisbane’s Bayside region lies the Lota Creek Boardwalk that connects the Lota Parklands to the natural reserve areas of Ransome. Take yourself on a leisurely afternoon stroll through paperbark and eucalyptus forests, mangroves and saltmarshes either by foot or on a bicycle. The flat 1 kilometre walk is suitable for everyone and is even wheelchair accessible. With bench seats dotted along the boardwalk and bitumen tracks, there’s plenty of opportunity to have a moment to yourself and take in your surroundings.

Whites Road, Lota
Toohey Forest Reserve
Toohey Forest. Photographed by Nyema Robins. Image via Instagram (@nyemacontessa)

Toohey Forest Reserve

Another spot to visit if you’re looking for a slice of nature nestled amongst the southside suburbia is Toohey Forest and the adjacent Mount Gravatt Outlook Reserve. Bordered by Nathan, Tarragindi, Mount Gravatt and Holland Park, this vast eucalypt bushland area has a multitude of different tracks to choose from. The area is well signed and most of the tracks are easy to manage regardless of fitness level. If you want to get your calf muscles working, try the Summit Track that takes you to the top of Mount Gravatt.

600 Toohey Road, Nathan
Walkabout Creek, Enoggera Reservoir
Walkabout Creek Enoggera Reservoir. Photographed by Vicki Niemeyer. Image via Instagram (@vicki.niemeyer)

Walkabout Creek, Enoggera Reservoir

Arguably one of Brisbane’s most popular watering holes, Enoggera Reservoir is a gorgeous spot to take a dip and get some fresh air. You can also take a lengthy walk around the perimeter of the reservoir which takes roughly two-and-a-half hours. The track does include some fairly steep hills and can appear misleading as it merges with the surrounding suburbs, so it’s recommended to head into the information centre to grab a map before you set off on your adventure. The lush canopied forests and abundance of wildlife make this walk one not to miss.

60 Mount Nebo Road, Enoggera Reservoir

What pairs seamlessly with a morning walk? Brunch of course! Check out these 7 Brisbane cafes that are offering takeaway brunch! Or, if you’d rather keep on top of your fitness game, why not sign up to one of these Brisbane fitness classes that are now online?

Feature image: Secluded Rainforest Boardwalk. Photographed by Madeline Paulsen. Image supplied via Hunter and Bligh

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