Life & Style

Sowing Ideas For National Tree Day

National Tree Day 2018 hits Australia today, Sunday, July 29, and we’ve decided to seek expert guidance for your sowing choices.

Our main man is David Laughlin, a horticultural supervisor at Centennial Parklands. David has kindly shared a special list of plants to grow in your yard, garden or flowerpot.

“Generally, at this time of the year in Sydney, you can plant just about anything,” David said. “Winter is all about getting our gardens ready for spring.”

David’s commitment to horticulture is highlighted in his recent blog post on Centennial Parkland’s enormous collection of trees. It’s also worth mentioning that Centennial Parklands has curated a self-guided online tour that takes you through the park’s tree history.

We want to highlight some of our spectacular trees, and we want to show how remarkable they are,” David said. “We don’t really pay them much attention, but they’re important, they provide us oxygen and clear the air.”

Now, without further ado, here are David’s top plants to plant this Sunday (or during any winter for that matter):

NSW Christmas Bush – Ceratopetalum gummiferum

Image: Source

This is the first that sprung to David’s mind. The NSW Christmas Bush is a seasonal staple, blooming in florists around Christmas time. Who needs to kiss under a mistletoe when you can smooch under a Christmas Bush?

Planting tips

Coastal Banksia – Banksia integrifolia

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Australia has a nice handful of native banksias, each with their own unique flair. This one is one of the more tough banksias, tolerating full sun and the sandiest of soils. They can also handle those coastal winds quite well.

Planting tips

Old Man Banksia – Banksia serrata

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Old Man Banksia grows like a gnarled shrub, with a labyrinthine explosion of branches. What’s more is its influence on popular culture. Author May Gibbs created characters based on the flowers, called the big bad banksia men who are crafty villains.

Planting tips

Wollemi Pine Tree – Wollemia nobilis

Wollemi Pine is one of the world’s oldest trees, but one of horticulture’s latest discoveries. It was discovered in 1994, and is suitable as either an small indoor plant, or a gigantic outdoor tree. Planting one of these babies will also help preserve the species, and prolong a life that has lived as far back as the dinosaurs.

Planting tips

Tree Waratah – Alloxylon flameum

Waratahs come in a wonderful array of colours and styles, but are well-known in red – or the tree waratah, either way a beautiful addition to your garden. David said they are best planted in an area that doesn’t get too hot, although they could survive full sun. Perhaps propped up against the fence among a flowerbed.

Planting tips

Native Frangipani – Hymenosporum flavum

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Apart from the way it looks, this Frangipani is similar to the Waratah Tree in many ways, David said. They grow beautiful yellow flowers that are as a bright as they are fragrant. A perfect specimen for the garden.

Planting tips

Dwarf Apple Gum – Angophora hispida

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This is David’s favourite of the smaller trees. The Dwarf apple gum is a great little tree that resides around Sydney, and attracts birds and bees. By summer, you’ll be able to enjoy a spot of reading in your back garden as chirping sounds pervade the air.

Planting tips

Mulla Mulla – Ptilotus exaltatus

These flowers are really unusual, don’t you think? But they are beautiful. It’s an Australian plant from the desert regions and if you plant it this weekend, the flowers will bloom by Spring. Perfect for the photographer who likes macro shots.

Planting tips

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