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Raising Vegan Children – The Mystical Debate

Veganism, the practice of refraining from consuming or using products that are sourced from animals. No beef, no eggs and most certainly no ice cream. Unless stated otherwise that it’s vegan friendly.

It isn’t a religion.

Similar to your born or latter belief in a higher being; it is a personal choice. However, stepping outside your Catholic denomination bubble you’ll soon be surprised with the reality that there are certain sectors of religions around the world that regulate veganism.

The huge mystical debate is whether or not veganism should be practised amongst children. Bringing them up in a vegan way of life. So what is the difference between choosing a faith and choosing what products your children can consume? Personally, I say very little.

Baptising your child or introducing them to a particular faith (most likely the one you already have a strong belief in) has a lot of similarities to converting or raising your offspring as a vegan.

A handful of religions out on the market do condone the consumption of meat and animal-sourced products. From Judaism to Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism and even Jainism (the teaching of salvation and liberation through a harmless life).

Even though most of these popular religions available don’t necessarily believe in veganism per say; vegetarianism is quite dominant to a certain extent.

Christians out there remember, no meat on Fridays throughout the duration of Lent! Is this all meat? Or just red? Or is it animal-derived products as a whole? Growing up, Fridays in Lent meant that no red meat was allowed to be consumed – fish/seafood was acceptable.

So what is the true difference between a vegetarian and vegan? Well, one drinks milk and the other doesn’t. Weirdly enough I have an Aunty who’s vegetarian but eats chicken – that’s just how my world works okay.

Vegans don’t really bother me. I mean no one’s ever hassled me in a steak house as I’m about to devour a killer T-bone steak with a side of chips and salad. But what I have seen is an acquaintance persuading others to turn against animal products.

My opinion is that although like a religion; the choice of trying to live a vegan life should be a personal choice, the recipient should be able to choose this decision themselves when they are more socially conscious. But why is it okay for the majority of us to choose the faith and religion for our offspring. How is this different?

Being born and baptised as a Christian myself is, unfortunately, something I don’t necessarily associate myself with today. I grew up surrounded by the Catholic church and its ancient teachings, followed by attending Catholic schools throughout my years of education. My older schooling years opened my eyes to the true teachings and belief behind Christianity which sadly pushed my faith elsewhere. It just wasn’t for me.

I guess this is quite the same for people who associate themselves as vegans today. Being born around an industry that relies on animal-sourced products, to then realise the truth, and then questioning whether or not this practice or way of life was best suited for you and what you morally believe in.

Being swallowed into the world of understanding vegans as a non-vegan, we seem to think that this belief system of people don’t receive all of the much-needed nutrients and supplements that are found in animal products – they assure us otherwise. Whatever a vegan can’t eat from a normal diet, they’ll find an alternative. But are these alternatives suitable for children? Better yet, are they suitable for newborn babies?

Feature image by Dezajny. Image via Shutterstock.

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